URBAN WILDERNESS

April 14, 2008 - Eric Ford-Holevinski


THE BRONX ZOO


WORLD OF DARKNESS (ZOO EXHIBIT)

Photos of the Bronx aren't very common on the web; now you know why.

THE CONSERVATORY GARDEN

Oops! I thought I was in the United States.

THE CLOISTERS

Smile!

NEW YORK BY NIGHT


Butts.

PARKS



Somebody knows where his priorities are.

OTHER


The Politician-Caught-in-a-Scandal Face


ABOUT THE PICTURES

Updated 5/27/2009.

The World of Darkness exhibit at the Bronx Zoo is a house of nocturnal animals. Since the animals are active at night, they keep it very dark in the exhibit -- so dark that your eyes require about five minutes to adjust. I took those pictures at ISO 6400, and of course I had to focus manually because autofocus fails in those conditions.

The Bronx is like another planet compared to the rest of New York. I know they're working on that borough and hopefully in 10 or 20 years it'll be in good shape, but right now it's pretty rough. Every building looks blighted, and one doesn't feel safe walking outside even in broad daylight.

I'm beginning to experiment with macro (extreme closeup) photography. I know flower photos are cliched and hard to do in an original way, but it's spring now, and I like to learn new techniques. The shot of the action figure is a macro photo. It is a robot from the classic anime, Neon Genesis Evangelion. As you can see, closeup pictures like these can have the ultimate in sharpness, but to get there you must be very careful. The closer the focus is, the more movements from the camera, your hands, or the subject are exaggerated. Even the weakest of breezes will ruin a plant closeup. A tripod is required, which was a problem in the Conservatory Garden because the fascists who run New York City have decided to ban tripods there. I still managed to sneak in a few pictures with my tripod, though.

Feel free to email me if you're interested in purchasing prints.

Please don't save images onto your computer, link to them, etc.



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All work © 2008 Eric Ford-Holevinski